100+ Organic  St John's Wort Herbal Seeds-Medicinal Herbs-HYPERICUM PERFORATUM- Perennial Plant---G031
100+ Organic  St John's Wort Herbal Seeds-Medicinal Herbs-HYPERICUM PERFORATUM- Perennial Plant---G031
100+ Organic  St John's Wort Herbal Seeds-Medicinal Herbs-HYPERICUM PERFORATUM- Perennial Plant---G031

100+ Organic St John's Wort Herbal Seeds-Medicinal Herbs-HYPERICUM PERFORATUM- Perennial Plant---G031

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100+ Organic St John's Wort Herbal Seeds-Medicinal Herbal Perennial-HYPERICUM PERFORATUM-G031

Description:

If you've looked into natural treatments for mild depression, you've probably heard about St. John's Wort. It's perhaps the most common herb used to elevate moods and decrease anxiety, and in most temperate regions, it's an easily-identified foraging plant...perfect for treating those lost-in-the-wilderness blues.

St. John's wort, also known as goatweed, chase-devil, Klamath weed, or by its botanical name Hypericum Perforatum dresses up any herb garden with its pretty yellow flowers and green, ovate leaves. It performs well in sunny, low-water gardens, and looks great when planted among other shrubby perennial herbs, particularly those with contrasting blooms and foliage. You won't be cooking any meals with St. John's wort, but it's a must-have for low-maintenance gardens, and for natural medicine practitioners wanting to grow a cornerstone herbal remedy plant.

 Geographic Origins:  Hypericum perforatum is native to Europe, western Asia (including the Himalayas) and northern Africa. Early settlers brought St. John's wort to the New World in the late 17th century, and it quickly took hold across the continent, where it's considered a noxious weed in some states. The plant is also used for spiritual rites. In less-than-educated times, mental illness was considered the work of the devil (or its cultural counterparts), and patients were treated with the herb. Since St. John's wort does raise serotonin levels, and "lifts spirits" in more ways than one, it became a tool in exorcisms in early Christian practices. European Catholics celebrated John the Baptist's birthday by gathering sprigs of freshly-bloomed Hypericum perforatum, which were thought to ward off or overpower demons and evil spirits. 

Let’s take a look at all the reasons why herbalists worship St. John's wort. Its oils, leaves, and flowers are used to treat the following: • Skin disorders (psoriasis, eczema) • Minor burns • Bruises • Insect bites and stings • Earaches • Inflammation • Rashes • Cuts and abrasions • Nerve pain • Depression • Anxiety • Hemorrhoids • Insomnia St. John's wort is considered an astringent, an antibacterial, and an anti-inflammatory, and its active chemical is Hypericin . It is undergoing studies to determine its antiviral properties as applied to HIV and Hepatitis C.

Growing St John’s Wort Seeds: Direct seed in the autumn or spring before the last frost. Start indoors 10-12 weeks before last frost, then plant out. May self-seed and spread around your garden. Appears as a prostrate ground cover the first year. Harvest fresh flower after morning due has dried, when crushed a reddish oil is produced. Seeds require light to germinate, press into soil, do not cover. Planting Depth surface requires light Soil Temp. Germ. 60-75˚F

Days to Germ. 14-30

Plant Spacing 12-18” Row Spacing 36”

Days To Maturity 90-120

Full Sun, Moist

Well Drained Shallow sow